alphadesigner

a designer from alpha centauri

August 28, 2014 at 5:07pm
40 notes
Reblogged from atlasofprejudice

Mummies weren’t always rare. In fact, they were quite abundant until at least the 16th Century. Then, for the weirdest of reasons, the extremely civilized Europeans started eating them.

— Chasing the Horizon, an excerpt from the Atlas of Prejudice, Volume 2 by Yanko Tsvetkov. (via atlasofprejudice)

(via atlasofprejudice)

August 25, 2014 at 11:45am
979 notes
Reblogged from magictransistor

magictransistor:

Alchemical and Rosicrucian Compendium (Selected Pages). Mellon MS 110. 1760.

(via ratak-monodosico)

August 19, 2014 at 8:36pm
13 notes

Gazpacho is a cold summer soup coming from Spain, the ancient homeland of all Hispanic people, which nowadays is ruled by Europe.

— Gazpacho Recipe According to US Americans: A Beginner’s Guide on the Preparation of Fresh, Antiseptic Spanish-style Tomato Soup

August 17, 2014 at 2:45pm
25 notes
The was a race between the Roman popes and the Ottoman sultans about fancy headgear. As you can see, things almost spiraled out of control, though there were no reported head injuries. Read more about it in Chasing Horizons, one of the chapters from the the second volume of my Atlas of Prejudice.

The was a race between the Roman popes and the Ottoman sultans about fancy headgear. As you can see, things almost spiraled out of control, though there were no reported head injuries. Read more about it in Chasing Horizons, one of the chapters from the the second volume of my Atlas of Prejudice.

August 16, 2014 at 1:12pm
43 notes
Sexy, agile barbarian sacking Rome? Yes, please! Read more about it in Chasing Horizons, one of the chapters from the the second volume of my Atlas of Prejudice.

Sexy, agile barbarian sacking Rome? Yes, please! Read more about it in Chasing Horizons, one of the chapters from the the second volume of my Atlas of Prejudice.

August 15, 2014 at 8:34pm
11 notes
Reblogged from atlasofprejudice

According to a popular legend, when Muhammad XII reached a nearby hill on his way to exile, he turned back to see his beloved palace for the last time. Overtaken by sadness and corroding sense of loss, he started to weep until his mother, a true incarnation of a perfect Muslim dominatrix, consoled him with the words, “Thou dost weep like a woman for what thou couldst not defend as a man.”

— Chasing the Horizon, an excerpt from the Atlas of Prejudice, Volume 2 by Yanko Tsvetkov. (via atlasofprejudice)

August 9, 2014 at 7:42pm
910 notes
Reblogged from fairytalesfor20somethings
fairytalesfor20somethings:

fairytalesfor20somethings:

Alice’s friends were probably out at the movies or going on dates, but she had much more exciting plans for her Friday night: Spend hours scrolling through Tumblr-land.

FRIDAYFRIDAYFRIDAY

fairytalesfor20somethings:

fairytalesfor20somethings:

Alice’s friends were probably out at the movies or going on dates, but she had much more exciting plans for her Friday night: Spend hours scrolling through Tumblr-land.

FRIDAY
FRIDAY
FRIDAY

(via beadelascisternas)

12:12am
2 notes

The great psychologist Abraham Maslow some years ago published a paper in which he discussed the values for which people live. He named five: survival, security, prestige, personal relationships, and self-development. And I remember when I read that I thought these are exactly the values that go completely to pieces when one is seized with a mythological zeal. If there is something you’re really living for, you will forget security, you will forget even survival, you will forget your prestige, you will even forget your friends, and as for self-development, that’s gone. When Jesus said, ‘He who loses his life shall find it’, he was talking about this. And it’s that jump, from the things that animals live for to the thing that only a human being can live for, that is the jump of the mystical moment of the virgin birth of the spiritual being.

— Joseph Campbell, “Man and Myth 2: Mythic Literature”

August 5, 2014 at 4:59pm
1 note

The fact is that you can do whatever you want with numbers. With reference to the discoveries made by the pyramidologists, an architect by the name of Jean-Pierre Adam conducted an experiment on a kiosk selling lottery tickets close to his house. The length of the counter was 149 centimeters, in other words one hundred billionth of the distance from Earth to the sun. The height at the rear divided by the width of the window was 176 ÷ 56 = 3.14. The height of the front was 19 decimeters, in other words equal to the number of years in the Greek lunar cycle. The sum of the heights of the two front corners and the two rear corners was 190 × 2 + 176 × 2 = 732, which is the date of the victory at the Battle of Poitiers. The thickness of the counter was 3.10 centimeters and the width of the window frame 8.8 centimeters. By substituting the whole numbers with the corresponding letter of the alphabet, we arrive at C₁₀H₈, which is the formula of naphthalene.

— Umberto Eco, quoting his own work On the Perverse Use of Mathematics in his Book of Legendary Lands.

August 4, 2014 at 9:17pm
754 notes
Reblogged from alias-on-life

The reason we struggle with insecurity is because we compare our behind-the-scenes with everyone else’s highlight reel.

— Steven Furtick (via xbox420)

(Source: alias-on-life, via beadelascisternas)

July 31, 2014 at 4:42pm
42 notes
Reblogged from atlasofprejudice

History is a strange creature. It has the amazing ability to blind us with our own reflection when we peek over its deep, mysterious waters. Many of us drown in them just like the mythological Narcissus, whose infatuation with his own beauty was stronger than his survival instincts. Those who don’t know history may be bound to repeat it. But even people who know it may follow the same fate if they interpret it exclusively in their own favor.

— Contemplating Prejudice, an excerpt from the Atlas of Prejudice, Volume 1 by Yanko Tsvetkov. (via atlasofprejudice)

July 29, 2014 at 6:35pm
90 notes
Reblogged from engineeringhistory
engineeringhistory:

Georg Busch’s depiction of a new astral body found in the Cassiopeia constellation, 1572. The body, a star going supernova now called SN1572, was only visible for a few weeks, and described by extensively by Tycho Brahe. Busch assumed the body was a comet created by human sin and wound in a tight ball.

engineeringhistory:

Georg Busch’s depiction of a new astral body found in the Cassiopeia constellation, 1572. The body, a star going supernova now called SN1572, was only visible for a few weeks, and described by extensively by Tycho Brahe. Busch assumed the body was a comet created by human sin and wound in a tight ball.

5:59pm
1,028 notes
Reblogged from theeconomist
ratak-monodosico:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

ratak-monodosico:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

(Source: theeconomist)

3:01pm
4 notes

Don’t we all pine for the simple life? The life of the baker or shoemaker or even the Parisian waitress like Amélie? After all, it seems so simple. When the rich, or even the middle class, imagine the lives of the working class or poor, they envision an existence that is uncomplicated, void of stress, pure, and moral.

— Why the Rich Romanticize the Working Class, by Cody C. Delistraty

July 28, 2014 at 10:01pm
49 notes
Reblogged from atlasofprejudice

One of the most powerful monarchs Europe had ever seen, Charles V, by the grace of God, Holy Roman Emperor, forever August, King of Germany, King of Italy, King of all Spains, of Castile, Aragon, León, Navarra, Grenada, Toledo, Valencia, Galicia, Majorca, Sevilla, Cordova, Murcia, Jaén, Algarves, Algeciras, Gibraltar, the Canary Islands, King of Two Sicilies, of Sardinia, Corsica, King of Jerusalem, King of the Western and Eastern Indies, Lord of the Islands and Main Ocean Sea, Archduke of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, Brabant, Lorraine, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, Limburg, Luxembourg, Gelderland, Neopatria, Württemberg, Landgrave of Alsace, Prince of Swabia, Asturia and Catalonia, Count of Flanders, Habsburg, Tyrol, Gorizia, Barcelona, Artois, Burgundy Palatine, Hainaut, Holland, Seeland, Ferrette, Kyburg, Namur, Roussillon, Cerdagne, Drenthe, Zutphen, Margrave of the Holy Roman Empire, Burgau, Oristano and Gociano, Lord of Frisia, the Wendish March, Pordenone, Biscay, Molin, Salins, Tripoli and Mechelen, was a product of centuries of exquisite royal incest.

— The European Age of Incest, and excerpt from the Atlas of Prejudice, Volume 1 by Yanko Tsvetkov. (via atlasofprejudice)