alphadesigner

a designer from alpha centauri

July 29, 2014 at 6:35pm
85 notes
Reblogged from engineeringhistory
engineeringhistory:

Georg Busch’s depiction of a new astral body found in the Cassiopeia constellation, 1572. The body, a star going supernova now called SN1572, was only visible for a few weeks, and described by extensively by Tycho Brahe. Busch assumed the body was a comet created by human sin and wound in a tight ball.

engineeringhistory:

Georg Busch’s depiction of a new astral body found in the Cassiopeia constellation, 1572. The body, a star going supernova now called SN1572, was only visible for a few weeks, and described by extensively by Tycho Brahe. Busch assumed the body was a comet created by human sin and wound in a tight ball.

5:59pm
913 notes
Reblogged from theeconomist
ratak-monodosico:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

ratak-monodosico:

Battle scars: see how the first world war changed the shape of Europe with our interactive map

(Source: theeconomist)

3:01pm
4 notes

Don’t we all pine for the simple life? The life of the baker or shoemaker or even the Parisian waitress like Amélie? After all, it seems so simple. When the rich, or even the middle class, imagine the lives of the working class or poor, they envision an existence that is uncomplicated, void of stress, pure, and moral.

— Why the Rich Romanticize the Working Class, by Cody C. Delistraty

July 28, 2014 at 10:01pm
47 notes
Reblogged from atlasofprejudice

One of the most powerful monarchs Europe had ever seen, Charles V, by the grace of God, Holy Roman Emperor, forever August, King of Germany, King of Italy, King of all Spains, of Castile, Aragon, León, Navarra, Grenada, Toledo, Valencia, Galicia, Majorca, Sevilla, Cordova, Murcia, Jaén, Algarves, Algeciras, Gibraltar, the Canary Islands, King of Two Sicilies, of Sardinia, Corsica, King of Jerusalem, King of the Western and Eastern Indies, Lord of the Islands and Main Ocean Sea, Archduke of Austria, Duke of Burgundy, Brabant, Lorraine, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola, Limburg, Luxembourg, Gelderland, Neopatria, Württemberg, Landgrave of Alsace, Prince of Swabia, Asturia and Catalonia, Count of Flanders, Habsburg, Tyrol, Gorizia, Barcelona, Artois, Burgundy Palatine, Hainaut, Holland, Seeland, Ferrette, Kyburg, Namur, Roussillon, Cerdagne, Drenthe, Zutphen, Margrave of the Holy Roman Empire, Burgau, Oristano and Gociano, Lord of Frisia, the Wendish March, Pordenone, Biscay, Molin, Salins, Tripoli and Mechelen, was a product of centuries of exquisite royal incest.

— The European Age of Incest, and excerpt from the Atlas of Prejudice, Volume 1 by Yanko Tsvetkov. (via atlasofprejudice)

July 20, 2014 at 10:01pm
1 note

The sense of wonder is a cruel temptress. It may lift people up spiritually but as their souls glide in the air, their underwear is exposed for everyone to see.

— The Liquid Horizon, Beach Stories

July 15, 2014 at 4:54pm
8 notes
Reblogged from atlasofprejudice

The Content of This Book Is Non-negotiable :) →

atlasofprejudice:

Let’s just remind everybody that this book is ABOUT prejudiced people, not FOR prejudiced people. You know, I get giggly when I see some of us describing Israel as the “only respecter of human rights” in the Middle East. I get even more giggly when those same people threaten not to buy my book…

July 12, 2014 at 3:54pm
49 notes
Reblogged from atlasofprejudice
atlasofprejudice:

The World According to Israel 2012 from the English edition of the Atlas of Prejudice book by Yanko Tsvetkov, presenting the Mapping Stereotypes project.

atlasofprejudice:

The World According to Israel 2012 from the English edition of the Atlas of Prejudice book by Yanko Tsvetkov, presenting the Mapping Stereotypes project.

July 6, 2014 at 7:39pm
227 notes
Reblogged from itsquoted

Whatever is a reality today, whatever you touch and believe in and that seems real for you today, is going to be – like the reality of yesterday – an illusion tomorrow.

— Luigi Pirandello (via itsquoted)

(via beadelascisternas)

July 4, 2014 at 12:32am
311 notes
Reblogged from gif-guy

(via ratak-monodosico)

July 3, 2014 at 2:28am
403 notes
Reblogged from explore-blog

A surprising number of people retain from childhood the idea that there is a fixed amount of wealth in the world. There is, in any normal family, a fixed amount of money at any moment. But that’s not the same thing. When wealth is talked about in this context, it is often described as a pie. “You can’t make the pie larger,” say politicians…

What leads people astray here is the abstraction of money. Money is not wealth. It’s just something we use to move wealth around. So although there may be, in certain specific moments (like your family, this month) a fixed amount of money available to trade with other people for things you want, there is not a fixed amount of wealth in the world. You can make more wealth. Wealth has been getting created and destroyed (but on balance, created) for all of human history.

— Y-Combinator founder Paul Graham on money vs. wealth and how the pie fallacy limits our lives (via explore-blog)

July 2, 2014 at 1:16pm
1 note
Years ago…

Years ago…

July 1, 2014 at 10:37pm
451 notes
Reblogged from explore-blog

The 40-hour workweek is mostly a thing of the past…

Taking some time off actually improves a worker’s productivity at work. A study from Ernst & Young found that every ten hours of vacation time taken by an employee boosted her year-end performance rating by 8 percent and lowered turnover. Former NASA scientists found that people who take vacations experience an 82 percent increase in job performance upon their return, with longer vacations making more of an impact than short ones.

— 

You’re working too hard.

Why not avoid work altogether, or at least live knowing that presence is more intricate and rewarding an art than productivity?

(via explore-blog)

June 30, 2014 at 2:16pm
2 notes
Color Harmony

Color Harmony

June 28, 2014 at 3:39pm
12 notes
Morning flex

Morning flex

June 25, 2014 at 4:34pm
310 notes
Reblogged from arsvitaest

ratak-monodosico:

TURKEY From Kitab-ı bahriye (Book of Navigation) by Piri Reis, Turkey, 

late 11th century AH / 17th CE early 12th century AH / 18th CE

Digitized book available here: thedigitalwalters.org

(Source: arsvitaest)